The Nameless Horror

[What bugs me most about thrillers or SF novels is] either the stock main characters – almost entirely rugged Sam Fisher/Jack Bauer types, with or without a criminal past, or else thinly-veiled Mary Sues of the author – or else the stakes. It’s always the whole world/universe/humanity/US at risk if Stubble McChin/Feisty McBoobs doesn’t punch a lot of guys in the face/eyestalks/cybernetic death appendages.
I get interviewed by the good folk of SFX mag online.

Lessons In Plotting 1: Running

You can only run away from something for a scene at most. Beyond that it loses its impact. Anything longer than that, your characters need to be running towards something instead.

Away from is reactive, a response to something rather than a determined choice: There’s a monster behind us and we don’t want to be eaten! AIIIEEE! It’s chasing us!

Towards is active and implies planning and forethought from the characters: We need to get to the evac point before the chopper leaves, and then we’ll have gotten away from the monster for good!

I may refer to this in future as the GET TO DA CHOPPA! rule.

Progress

ALEX SAYS THAT STEF AND KYLE HAVE TO COME SEE THIS. SHE SAYS SHE’S FOUND OUT WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HOUSE, AND IT’S NOTHING LIKE WHAT THEY SAW BACK IN THE OTHER NEIGHBOURHOOD (WHICH NEEDS A NAME BY THE WAY, JOHN).

I have, for a very loose value of “halfway” reached the halfway point on the current book.

I may, or may not, have written almost as many chapters as notes as I have in proper actual text.

This is not cheating.

NOT CHEATING.